Events by Other Organisations

The ‘One Country, Two Systems’ policy and the Rule of Law in Hong Kong

Date: May 24, 2017
Time: 16:00 – 17:00

Rimsky Yuen Kwok-keung, Secretary for Justice of Hong Kong, will make a public speech at Asia House about the development of Hong Kong’s rule of law over the past two decades and his outlook for the future.

The first day of July this year will mark the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong’s transfer of sovereignty from the UK to China. It also marks the beginning of the ‘One Country, Two Systems’ model and the adaption of the Basic Law that stipulates the relationship between Hong Kong and the Central Government.

The Basic Law has, however, been subject to some controversy due to its ambiguity in how it could be interpreted. “It has to be read both from Hong Kong’s angle, as well as that of the central government, otherwise it is impossible to safeguard the co-existence of the ‘two systems’ under the ‘one country’ framework,” Mr Yuen said, commenting on the importance of the law.

Mr Yuen was appointed Secretary for Justice on July 1, 2012.  He was a barrister in private practice before joining the Government, specialising in commercial disputes.  He also served as an arbitrator in international arbitrations and a mediator in commercial disputes. He was appointed Senior Counsel in 2003 and a Recorder of the Court of First Instance of the High Court in 2006.

To register your interest in attending, please contact Conor Paterson at conor.paterson@asiahouse.co.uk.


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Hong Kong Arts Festival will present the European premiere of Chan Hing-yan’s dazzling three-act chamber opera, Datong: The Chinese Utopia in London this summer in celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the Establishment of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China.

Datong:  The Chinese Utopia tells the incredible story of major utopian philosopher and constitutional reformer in China, Kang Youwei, and his pioneering daughter, Kang Tongbi. Directed by Tang Shu-wing (Titus Andronicus and Macbeth, Shakespeare’s Globe) with libretto by acclaimed playwright and filmmaker Evans Chan, and performed by a stellar cast of HK musicians conducted by Lio Kuokman, Datong: The Chinese Utopia will have a strictly limited run at Richmond Theatre on 27 and 28 July 2017.

Datong: The Chinese Utopia enjoyed a sold-out run in Hong Kong for its 2015 world premiere captivating audiences with its philosophical and poetic retelling of history and heroism. It will be performed in Chinese and English with English surtitles.

“Astounding music” (Bachtrack).

“Musically intriguing” (Financial Times).

27 July, 2:30pm

28 July, 7:30pm

Richmond Theatre, London

Datong: The Chinese Utopia, a HKAF production under the Jockey Club Local Creative Talents Series in 2015. The London tour is funded by the Hong Kong Arts Development Council.

For details of the production and its trailer, please refer to http://www.atgtickets.com/shows/datong-the-chinese-utopia/richmond-theatre/


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Hong Kong’s Intangible Cultural Heritage Symposium

by Ming-Ai (London) Institute

Mon 15 May 2017

FREE TO ATTEND

At this symposium, renowned intellectuals and chefs will be sharing their views on Hong Kong’s heritage and the culture of Chinese food in the UK.

13:00 – 13:30 Registration and Refreshements

13:30 – 14:15 KEYNOTE SPEECH
Sek Pun (Basin Feast): From Village Communal Banquet to Intangible Cultural Heritage in Hong Kong by Hing Wah Chau, Curator of Intangible Cultural Heritage Office, Leisure and Cultural Service Department, Hong Kong

14:15 – 14:45
The Conversation of Chinese Treasure in the UK and Hong Kong by Wingyiu Wong

14:45 – 15:00
British Chinese Food Culture by Chungwen Li, Dean of Ming-Ai (London) Institute

15:00 – 15:30 Tea & Coffee

15:30 – 17:00 OPEN FORUM: British Chinese Food

Moderator
Dr Vivienne Lo, Director of China Centre for Health and Humanity, University College London

Speaker
Ken Hom, TV Chef and Cookery Author

Formal Discussants
Ching-He Huang, TV Chef and Cookery Author
Andy Kwok, Director at Good Earth Group
Andrew Wong, Owner and Chef at A. Wong

Visit https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/hong-kongs-intangible-cultural-heritage-symposium-tickets-34069219954?aff=es2 to register


UPCOMING EVENTS FROM THE  FRIENDS OF THE ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY HONG KONG BRANCH

Saturday, 3rd June - Lecture and lunch

Ireland’s Imperial Mandarin: How Sir Robert Hart became the most influential foreigner in Qing China

Speaker:                     Mark O’Neill

Time:                          2:30 p.m.

Venue:                        Royal Asiatic Society, 14 Stephenson Way, London NW1 2HD

Cost:                           £8 per member or guest, to include refreshments

Lunch:                        A self-paying lunch will be arranged at 12:30 p.m. at Chutneys, 124 Drummond Street, London NW1 2PA (corner of North Gower Street.)  Tel: 020 7388 0604.  Please note on the booking form if you wish to join the lunch.

Booking:                     Please complete the booking form below and return it with your cheque asap.

Sir Robert Hart served as the Inspector-General of the Imperial Maritime Customs Service of the Qing dynasty from 1863 until his death in 1911. No foreigner has ever had or will ever have the life he did in China. He provided the government with more than 20 per cent of its annual revenue, set up the Chinese Post Office, founded a system of lighthouses along the coast, bought British warships that were the foundation of the modern Chinese navy and negotiated a peace treaty to end the Sino-French war of 1884-85. He was a trusted confidant of government leaders who constantly sought his advice on how to deal with the aggressive and meddling foreigners. His finest hour came in the Boxer Rebellion of 1900. With 1,300 other foreigners and 3,100 Chinese, he was trapped in the Legation Quarter of Beijing for 55 days, ready for death. After the siege, many called for partition of China or imposition of a new dynasty – but Hart argued that the fault for the rebellion lay with the foreigners.  His personal life was just as dramatic. He had a Chinese lady friend, Miss Ayaou, with whom he had three children. He sent them to be brought up by a foster family in London. Then he married an Irish lady from his home place; they also had three children. He did everything possible to prevent the two families from knowing of or meeting the other.  Mark O’Neill uses a wide range of sources, in English and Chinese, to describe this fascinating and complex character in all his many colours.

Mark O’Neill is British and worked as a journalist in Britain, Hong Kong and Taiwan before joining Reuters in 1983. He spent 13 years with the world’s leading news agency in Hong Kong, New Delhi, Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo before joining the South China Morning Post, for which he worked in Beijing and Shanghai.  Since 2007 he had been a lecturer in journalism at Baptist University, Hong Kong University and United International College, Zhuhai and a freelance journalist for publications including the South China Morning Post.

His past publications include a biography of his grandfather Rev Frederick O’Neill, an Irish Presbyterian missionary in China and books on the Chinese Labour Corp in Europe and the Chinese in Russia in World War One. He has also written about 12 outstanding people of Xiangshan in the late Qing and early Republican periods.  His gave a talk to us last year on his book about the two Palace Museums in Beijing and Taipei, “The Miraculous History of China’s Two Palace Museums” “兩故宫的世纪傳奇”.

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Saturday, 5th August  - Lecture and lunch

The Story of Marion Young: Missionary in Japanese-occupied China

Speaker:                     Neil T. Sinclair 

Time:                          2:30 p.m.

Venue:                        Royal Asiatic Society, 14 Stephenson Way, London NW1 2HD

Cost:                           £8 per member or guest, to include refreshments

Lunch:                        A self-paying lunch will be arranged at 12:30 p.m. at ‘Red and Hot’, 37 Chalton Street, NW1 1JD. Please note on the booking form if you wish to join the lunch.

Booking:                     Please complete the booking form below and return it with your cheque asap.

In 1935 Marion Young arrived in China and for the next six years she wrote weekly letters home to her parents in Ireland.  Her letters and photographs give a vivid picture of life in the market town of Faku and of the villages in Inner Mongolia which Marion visited as part of her mission work.

Neil Sinclair’s talk will cover her voyage out to China, her stay in Peking at the Language School and her life as a missionary in Faku, a market town in Manchuria, and her journeys out to villages in western Manchuria and Inner Mongolia.  Neil will use photographs taken by Marion which show transport, agriculture etc. from that time.  Neil’s recently published book Letters from Manchuria is published by Little Knoll Press and available from www.littleknollbookshop.co.uk.  Copies of his book and also another on Marion’s parents’ memories of missionaries in Southern China will be available to buy at the lecture.

To book to attend any of these events, please click here to download and print the booking form.


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LSE Confucius Institute for Business London

For details of their Business Chinese Courses on Campus visit http://www.lse.ac.uk/CIBL/Language%20Courses/CIBLCourseOnCampus.aspx

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